Goddard May 1926 Rocket

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    Goddard May 1926 Rocket

    Three cylinders mounted one atop the other and separated by connecting propellant and other pipes. The smallest cylinder, which served as the combustion chamber, is at the bottom, with adjoining, welded on exhaust nozzle. Chamber with welded dome on top with one pipe protruding from center and four equidistant pipes protruding upward from the periphery of the top of the chamber. Two of these pipes lead into the next and largest sized oxidizer (liquid oxygen) tank while the remaining two pipes lead to the uppermost (gasoline ) fuel tank above. Both propellant tanks are flat on the top, From the uppermost fuel tank is projecting a looped or arched pipe stretching from one side of the tank to the other. No shroud, also to save weight.

    1 of 5

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

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    Goddard May 1926 Rocket

    Three cylinders mounted one atop the other and separated by connecting propellant and other pipes. The smallest cylinder, which served as the combustion chamber, is at the bottom, with adjoining, welded on exhaust nozzle. Chamber with welded dome on top with one pipe protruding from center and four equidistant pipes protruding upward from the periphery of the top of the chamber. Two of these pipes lead into the next and largest sized oxidizer (liquid oxygen) tank while the remaining two pipes lead to the uppermost (gasoline ) fuel tank above. Both propellant tanks are flat on the top, From the uppermost fuel tank is projecting a looped or arched pipe stretching from one side of the tank to the other. No shroud, also to save weight.

    2 of 5

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

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    Goddard May 1926 Rocket

    Three cylinders mounted one atop the other and separated by connecting propellant and other pipes. The smallest cylinder, which served as the combustion chamber, is at the bottom, with adjoining, welded on exhaust nozzle. Chamber with welded dome on top with one pipe protruding from center and four equidistant pipes protruding upward from the periphery of the top of the chamber. Two of these pipes lead into the next and largest sized oxidizer (liquid oxygen) tank while the remaining two pipes lead to the uppermost (gasoline ) fuel tank above. Both propellant tanks are flat on the top, From the uppermost fuel tank is projecting a looped or arched pipe stretching from one side of the tank to the other. No shroud, also to save weight.

    3 of 5

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Goddard May 1926 Rocket

    Three cylinders mounted one atop the other and separated by connecting propellant and other pipes. The smallest cylinder, which served as the combustion chamber, is at the bottom, with adjoining, welded on exhaust nozzle. Chamber with welded dome on top with one pipe protruding from center and four equidistant pipes protruding upward from the periphery of the top of the chamber. Two of these pipes lead into the next and largest sized oxidizer (liquid oxygen) tank while the remaining two pipes lead to the uppermost (gasoline ) fuel tank above. Both propellant tanks are flat on the top, From the uppermost fuel tank is projecting a looped or arched pipe stretching from one side of the tank to the other. No shroud, also to save weight.

    4 of 5

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Goddard May 1926 Rocket

    Three cylinders mounted one atop the other and separated by connecting propellant and other pipes. The smallest cylinder, which served as the combustion chamber, is at the bottom, with adjoining, welded on exhaust nozzle. Chamber with welded dome on top with one pipe protruding from center and four equidistant pipes protruding upward from the periphery of the top of the chamber. Two of these pipes lead into the next and largest sized oxidizer (liquid oxygen) tank while the remaining two pipes lead to the uppermost (gasoline ) fuel tank above. Both propellant tanks are flat on the top, From the uppermost fuel tank is projecting a looped or arched pipe stretching from one side of the tank to the other. No shroud, also to save weight.

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This device is the oldest surviving liquid-propellant rocket in the world. It was designed and built by U.S. rocket experimenter Robert H. Goddard in Worcester, Massachusetts. It was Goddard's first in which the motor was placed at the base, instead of in the nose. He had used the latter configuration on the world’s first liquid-propellant rocket to fly, which he launched on 16 March 1926. The May rocket likely includes the nozzle from that historic vehicle. His attempt to launch his new rocket on 4 and 5 May 1926 was not successful, as it did not have enough thrust to lift itself.

The Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation for the Promotion of Aeronautics gave this rocket to the Smithsonian in 1950.