Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22

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    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22

    Single-seat, all-metal monocoque construction and conventional layout with low wing and twin vertical fins and rudders, powered by "Campini" jet engine.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22

    Single-seat, all-metal monocoque construction and conventional layout with low wing and twin vertical fins and rudders, powered by "Campini" jet engine.

    2 of 9

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22

    Single-seat, all-metal monocoque construction and conventional layout with low wing and twin vertical fins and rudders, powered by "Campini" jet engine.

    3 of 9

    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka 22

    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22 on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. 

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    The Okha-22 Cherry Blossom at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    The Okha-22 Cherry Blossom. While a number of the rocket-powered Ohka 11 versions exist in museums worldwide, the NASM MXY7 Model 22 is the only "Campini" jet-powered example surviving.

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    Installing the Ohka Model 22

    Paul Garber (in cockpit) oversees the installation of the Kugisho MXY7 Model 22 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) kamikaze suicide bomb in the Arts & Industries Building. It was nicknamed by Americans "Baka" (Japanese for "idiot" or "fool"). The Ohka was transferred to Smithsonian in 1948 and displayed at Arts & Industries until the early 1970s when it was moved to the Garber Facility. Restoration began in 1994 and it was placed on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in 2003.

    Featured in National Air and Space Museum: An Autobiography 

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    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22 Nose and Wings

    In 1944, the Japanese Navy began to consider using human-guided missiles to crash themselves into Allied warships. To the Allies, these units became known as Kamikaze, or suicide squads. The Japanese used the word Tokko, or Special Attack. Tokko pilots flew almost every type of Japanese military airplane, but initial operations showed the need for an aircraft designed and built specifically for the purpose. The Japanese navy created the Ohka 22 when they modified the Ohka 11 design and added a crude jet engine to extend the piloted bomb’s glide distance. Highlighted in this image are the nose and wing of the Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22.

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    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22 Nose

    In 1944, the Japanese Navy began to consider using human-guided missiles to crash themselves into Allied warships. To the Allies, these units became known as Kamikaze, or suicide squads. The Japanese used the word Tokko, or Special Attack. Tokko pilots flew almost every type of Japanese military airplane, but initial operations showed the need for an aircraft designed and built specifically for the purpose. The Japanese navy created the Ohka 22 when they modified the Ohka 11 design and added a crude jet engine to extend the piloted bomb’s glide distance. Highlighted in this image is the nose of the Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22.

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    Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22 exhaust valve

    In 1944, the Japanese Navy began to consider using human-guided missiles to crash themselves into Allied warships. To the Allies, these units became known as Kamikaze, or suicide squads. The Japanese used the word Tokko, or Special Attack. Tokko pilots flew almost every type of Japanese military airplane, but initial operations showed the need for an aircraft designed and built specifically for the purpose. The Japanese navy created the Ohka 22 when they modified the Ohka 11 design and added a crude jet engine to extend the piloted bomb’s glide distance. Highlighted in this image is the exhaust valve of the Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the World War II Aviation (UHC) at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

World War II Aviation (UHC)

Near the end of World War II, Vice Admiral Onishi Takijiro recommended that the Japanese navy form special groups of men and aircraft to attack the American warships gathering to conduct amphibious landings in the Philippines. The Japanese used the word Tokko-tai (Special Attack) to describe these units. To the Allies, they became known as the kamikaze. By war's end, some 5,000 pilots died making Tokko attacks.

The Ohka (Cherry Blossom) Model 22 was designed to allow a pilot with minimal training to drop from a Japanese navy bomber and guide his aircraft with its warhead at high speed into an Allied warship. Plans were afoot in 1944 to adapt a version of the Yokosuka P1Y Ginga (Milky Way, Allied codename FRANCIS, see NASM collection) to carry the Model 22. While several rocket-powered Ohka 11s still exist, this Ohka 22 is the only surviving version powered by a motor-jet, which consisted of a reciprocating engine that pressurized a combustion chamber into which fuel was injected and ignited. Allied forces recovered the Ohka 22 in Japan in 1945. Unlike the Ohka 11, the Ohka 22 never became operational.