Kyushu J7W1 Shinden (Magnificent Lightning)

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    Kyushu J7W1 Shinden (Magnificent Lightning)

    Japan's J7W1 Shinden was the only World War II aircraft of canard configuration that any combatant ordered into production. The original meaning of Canard is obscure but aircraft designers use it to describe an aircraft with the main wing mounted at the rear of the fuselage and a smaller wing fixed to the front.

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    Kyushu J7W1 Shinden (Magnificent Lightning)

    Japan's J7W1 Shinden was the only World War II aircraft of canard configuration that any combatant ordered into production. The original meaning of Canard is obscure but aircraft designers use it to describe an aircraft with the main wing mounted at the rear of the fuselage and a smaller wing fixed to the front.    

    2 of 2

Display Status:

This object is on display in the World War II Aviation (UHC) at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

World War II Aviation (UHC)

Japan's J7W1 Shinden was the only World War II aircraft of canard configuration that any combatant ordered into production. Canard is a French term. The original meaning is obscure but aircraft designers used it then, as now, to describe an aircraft with the main wing mounted at the rear of the fuselage and a smaller wing fixed to the front. In the United States, the Curtiss-Wright company and the Army Air Corps also experimented with a canard aircraft, the Curtiss XP-55 Ascender (see NASM collection). However, the J7W1 was more advanced. Though innovative and unusual, neither airplane progressed past the early prototype stage.