Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq

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    Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq

    Charles A. Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh flew in this Lockheed Sirius low-wing monoplane, powered by a 680-hp Wright Cyclone. The Sirius had been designed in 1929 by John K. Northrop and Gerard Vultee. This particular model was specially fitted so as to fly with either pontoon floats for water landings or wheels for ground based operations.

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq

    Charles A. Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh flew in this Lockheed Sirius low-wing monoplane, powered by a 680-hp Wright Cyclone. The Sirius had been designed in 1929 by John K. Northrop and Gerard Vultee. This particular model was specially fitted so as to fly with either pontoon floats for water landings or wheels for ground based operations.

    2 of 6

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq

    Charles A. Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh flew in this Lockheed Sirius low-wing monoplane, powered by a 680-hp Wright Cyclone. The Sirius had been designed in 1929 by John K. Northrop and Gerard Vultee. This particular model was specially fitted so as to fly with either pontoon floats for water landings or wheels for ground based operations.

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    Lockheed Sirius Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the cockpit of the Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq.

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    Lockheed Sirius Cabin Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the cabin of the Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq.

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    Lockheed Sirius Rear Cockpit Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the rear cockpit of the Lockheed Sirius Tingmissartoq.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar

Charles A. Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, purchased this Lockheed Sirius airplane in 1929 for $22,825. Designed by Gerald Vultee and Jack Northrop, the Sirius was a low-wing monoplane with the same monocoque (molded shell) fuselage as the popular Lockheed Vega. Originally an open-cockpit landplane, the Lindberghs' Sirius was modified with a sliding canopy and Edo floats for their two overwater journeys in 1931 and 1933.

The Lindberghs set a coast-to-coast speed record in the Sirius on April 20, 1930, but its most significant flights were in 1931 and 1933. In 1931 the Lindberghs flew to the Orient, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the North. In 1933 they flew survey flights across the North and South Atlantic to gather information for planning commercial air routes. During their 1933 trip a Greenland Eskimo boy gave the Sirius its nickname: "Tingmissartoq"-"One who flies like a big bird."

Upon returning from their transatlantic trip in late 1933, the Lindberghs donated the "Tingmissartoq" to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. It was displayed in the Hall of Ocean Life until 1955, when it was sent to the United States Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio. After deciding that the Lindberghs' plane did not really represent the Air Force, the Air Force Museum transferred it to the Smithsonian Institution's Air Museum in 1959.