Manipulator Foot Restraint and Grapple Fixture, Shuttle, Hubble Space Telescope

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    Manipulator Foot Restraint and Grapple Fixture, Shuttle, Hubble Space Telescope

    Foot restraint for one astronaut with various attachment points and a grapple fixture. Attaches to Remote Manipulator System arm via grapple fixture; includes adjustable upright stanchion, retractable EVA tether/hook marked EV2 reeled out of a white ball, and another tether hook on a nylon web strap. Two levers marked Tilt and Rotation. Parts of structure wrapped in kapton and white thermal blanket. Arrived stowed in folded position; opens into L-shape with foot restraint mounted above grapple fixture extension.

    1 of 4

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Manipulator Foot Restraint and Grapple Fixture, Shuttle, Hubble Space Telescope

    Foot restraint for one astronaut with various attachment points and a grapple fixture. Attaches to Remote Manipulator System arm via grapple fixture; includes adjustable upright stanchion, retractable EVA tether/hook marked EV2 reeled out of a white ball, and another tether hook on a nylon web strap. Two levers marked Tilt and Rotation. Parts of structure wrapped in kapton and white thermal blanket. Arrived stowed in folded position; opens into L-shape with foot restraint mounted above grapple fixture extension.

    2 of 4

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Manipulator Foot Restraint and Grapple Fixture, Shuttle, Hubble Space Telescope

    Foot restraint for one astronaut with various attachment points and a grapple fixture. Attaches to Remote Manipulator System arm via grapple fixture; includes adjustable upright stanchion, retractable EVA tether/hook marked EV2 reeled out of a white ball, and another tether hook on a nylon web strap. Two levers marked Tilt and Rotation. Parts of structure wrapped in kapton and white thermal blanket. Arrived stowed in folded position; opens into L-shape with foot restraint mounted above grapple fixture extension.

    3 of 4

    Manipulator Foot Restraint

    This unit assisted astronauts working on the Hubble Space Telescope.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

James S. McDonnell Space Hangar

This adjustable foot restraint gave astronauts a portable extravehicular activity work station on the Space Shuttle’s mobile Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm). With boots anchored to the footplate and hands free for tools and equipment, an astronaut could be moved around and above the payload bay to do installation and repair tasks. The astronaut could orient the device to attain the best working position and attach necessary equipment to the upright post. The pronged grapple fixture at the end of the base fit securely into the far end of the 15-meter (50- foot) arm. Some of the most dramatic photos of the shuttle era featured an astronaut standing on this device high above the Earth against the black backdrop of space. NASA transferred this foot restraint from the Hubble Space Telescope program in 2011, after it had been used on servicing missions.