Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B

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    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B

    Arch rival to the U.S. F-86 in Korea, the MiG-15 shocked the West with its capabilities. The Soviets designed the aircraft in 1946 to answer an urgent need for a high-altitude day interceptor. It first flew in late 1947. The MiG-15 was the first Soviet jet to benefit from the British sale to Russia of the new Rolls Royce Nene and Derwent jet engines, which the Soviets immediately copied and refined. The resulting RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1 engines gave a powerful boost to Soviet jet technology.

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B

    Single-seat, single-engine (RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1), swept-wing, air superiority, jet fighter / interceptor.

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B

    Single-seat, single-engine (RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1), swept-wing, air superiority, jet fighter / interceptor.

    3 of 8

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B

    Single-seat, single-engine (RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1), swept-wing, air superiority, jet fighter / interceptor.

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    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15bis "Fagot B" at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    Arch rival to the U.S. F-86 in Korea, the MiG-15 shocked the West with its capabilities.
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    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B Nose

     

    Arch rival to the U.S. F-86 in Korea, the MiG-15 shocked the West with its capabilities. The Soviets designed the aircraft in 1946 to answer an urgent need for a high-altitude day interceptor. It first flew in late 1947. The MiG-15 was the first Soviet jet to benefit from the British sale to Russia of the new Rolls Royce Nene and Derwent jet engines, which the Soviets immediately copied and refined. The resulting RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1 engines gave a powerful boost to Soviet jet technology.

    6 of 8

    Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Ji-2) FAGOT B Wings

    Arch rival to the U.S. F-86 in Korea, the MiG-15 shocked the West with its capabilities. The Soviets designed the aircraft in 1946 to answer an urgent need for a high-altitude day interceptor. It first flew in late 1947. The MiG-15 was the first Soviet jet to benefit from the British sale to Russia of the new Rolls Royce Nene and Derwent jet engines, which the Soviets immediately copied and refined. The resulting RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1 engines gave a powerful boost to Soviet jet technology.

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    MiG-15 ready to move

    The Soviet MiG-15 (NATO designation, Fagot B) is loaded and ready to roll from the Garber Facility.
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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

Arch rival to the U.S. F-86 in Korea, the MiG-15 shocked the West with its capabilities. The Soviets designed the aircraft in 1946 to answer an urgent need for a high-altitude day interceptor. It first flew in late 1947. The MiG-15 was the first Soviet jet to benefit from the British sale to Russia of the new Rolls Royce Nene and Derwent jet engines, which the Soviets immediately copied and refined. The resulting RD-500, Klimov RD-45, and modified VK-1 engines gave a powerful boost to Soviet jet technology.

The MiG-15 featured the first production swept wing, pressurized cockpit, and ejection seat on a Soviet aircraft. Although Mikoyan and Gurevich were aware of German turbojet and swept-wing work, this design was wholly Russian, except for the engine. This MiG-15bis is a Chinese Ji-2 modification. The Smithsonian acquired it in 1985.