Mini-Centrifuge, Biomedical, Shuttle

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    Mini-Centrifuge, Biomedical, Shuttle

    Rectangular white plastic box with a smoke grey cover that opens to the interior of the centrifuge; rotor has six channels for capillary tubes; includes a brush with nylon bristles and two disposable steel lancets.

    1 of 2

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Mini-Centrifuge, Biomedical, Shuttle

    Rectangular white plastic box with a smoke grey cover that opens to the interior of the centrifuge; rotor has six channels for capillary tubes; includes a brush with nylon bristles and two disposable steel lancets.

    2 of 2

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This object is on display in the Moving Beyond Earth exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

This battery-powered mini-centrifuge was used in biomedical experiments on Space Shuttle missions. Crew members often drew blood samples in flight for later analysis by researchers on Earth. It is common practice to spin blood and urine samples in a centrifuge to separate their contents. Because the size and weight of everything matters in space, a mini-centrifuge, smaller than ones typically seen in labs and medical offices, was sufficient for the task. NASA gave this item and a variety of other experiment equipment to the Museum when no longer needed for spaceflight.