Model, Tsiolkovsky Space Craft

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    Model, Tsiolkovsky Space Craft

    Plastic, tear-drop shaped spacecraft with transparent plexiglas on the front showining four horizontal layers of living space and small spacsuit wearing cosmonauts.

    1 of 2

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Model, Tsiolkovsky Space Craft

    Plastic, tear-drop shaped spacecraft with transparent plexiglas on the front showining four horizontal layers of living space and small spacsuit wearing cosmonauts.

    2 of 2

Soviet model makers built this spacecraft based on the designs and notes of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky. Late in his life, much of Tsiolkovsky's theoretical work focused on ideas about transporting humans into space on board rockets. Although this model, reflecting the scientist's ideas, grossly overestimates the living space available on board a rocket, it does convey a sophisticated understanding of the physical constraints of space travel for that time. Among Tsiolkovsky's concerns were the effects of acceleration and weightlessness on the human body.

Gift of the Tsiolkovsky Russian National Space Museum, Kaluga, Russia.