Parka, Lockheed Sirius "Tingmissartoq", Lindbergh

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    Parka, Lockheed Sirius "Tingmissartoq", Lindbergh

    Anne Morrow Lindbergh's parka. A white wool parka with a large black stripe across the midsection just below two pockets. The parka is a slip on with a hat that buttons to the back of the collar and can be tied in the front.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Parka, Lockheed Sirius "Tingmissartoq", Lindbergh

    Anne Morrow Lindbergh's parka. A white wool parka with a large black stripe across the midsection just below two pockets. The parka is a slip on with a hat that buttons to the back of the collar and can be tied in the front.

    2 of 3

    Personal Flying Equipment

    Anne Morrow Lindbergh wore her Hudson Bay parka, cap, and handmade stocking boots and mittens as they arrived in Leningrad, U.S.S.R. In addition to outerwear, she and her husband, Charles Lindbergh each packed only 18 pounds of personal clothes.

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Anne Morrow Lindbergh wore this white wool parka as she flew with her husband Charles on survey flights across the North and South Atlantic in 1933. Anne and Charles filled most of their plane's storage space with tools, survival gear, and canned rations, allowing themselves only 18 pounds of personal luggage each, including suitcase. Their clothing thus had to be lightweight, but also warm since they would by flying over some of the coldest places on earth, including Greenland, Iceland, and Scandinavia. This parka and its accompanying hood weighed only 3.4 pounds and its thick wool would have kept Anne warm in the unheated cockpit.