Pocket, Checklist and Scissors, Collins, Apollo 11

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    Pocket, Checklist and Scissors, Collins, Apollo 11

    Two white fabric pockets on two straps with velcro closures. One pocket is larger than the other

    1 of 3

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Pocket, Checklist and Scissors, Collins, Apollo 11

    Two white fabric pockets on two straps with velcro closures. One pocket is larger than the other

    2 of 3

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Pocket, Checklist and Scissors, Collins, Apollo 11

    Two white fabric pockets on two straps with velcro closures. One pocket is larger than the other

    3 of 3

Display Status:

This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

These pockets were attached to the leg of the spacesuit worn by Michael Collins on the Apollo 11 mission in July, 1969.

Spacesuit construction and astronaut preferences meant that pockets to hold scissors, checklists and other small objects needed to be removable, with the possibility of placement elsewhere - on the other leg for example. They were attached to the spacesuit with the use of loops and tapes, and held in place with velcro tabs.

Transferred to the national Air and Spoace Museum from NASA in 1971.