Goddard 1935 A-Series Rocket

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    Goddard 1935 A-Series Rocket

    Long, torpedo-shaped with ogive nosecone with attachment screw on tip. Rocket slightly tapers down at rear, from from top of four long delta fins towards nozzle exit. Fins in cruciform arrangement. Four moveable blast vanes affixed with screws and moveable connecting rods on each left hand corner of each fin. Vane blades in the path of the rocket's exhaust exit. One steel tube running down each side of the rocket body, along propellant section and one smaller diameter tube on one side, along the same length. One quarter of the rocket's nosecone painted red and one quarter of the rocket body also painted red. Small cut horizontal section, 13.5 inches long by 2.5 inches wide, on side of parachute section, beneath nosecone, revealing wrapped parachute. Original panel over this small section missing but may be left this way for exhibit purposes to show parachute. Another small reactangular cut section, 4.25 inches by 2 7/16 inches, near end of rocket body, along propellant section, revealing a valve, probably for fueling. Detachable nosecone, with removal of attachment screw on nosecone tip, and revealing tank top and outlet with screw with square head and letter "G" stamped on it, possibly signifying "Goddard."

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Goddard 1935 A-Series Rocket

    Long, torpedo-shaped with ogive nosecone with attachment screw on tip. Rocket slightly tapers down at rear, from from top of four long delta fins towards nozzle exit. Fins in cruciform arrangement. Four moveable blast vanes affixed with screws and moveable connecting rods on each left hand corner of each fin. Vane blades in the path of the rocket's exhaust exit. One steel tube running down each side of the rocket body, along propellant section and one smaller diameter tube on one side, along the same length. One quarter of the rocket's nosecone painted red and one quarter of the rocket body also painted red. Small cut horizontal section, 13.5 inches long by 2.5 inches wide, on side of parachute section, beneath nosecone, revealing wrapped parachute. Original panel over this small section missing but may be left this way for exhibit purposes to show parachute. Another small reactangular cut section, 4.25 inches by 2 7/16 inches, near end of rocket body, along propellant section, revealing a valve, probably for fueling. Detachable nosecone, with removal of attachment screw on nosecone tip, and revealing tank top and outlet with screw with square head and letter "G" stamped on it, possibly signifying "Goddard."

    2 of 2

This is probably the liquid-fuel rocket Robert H. Goddard tried to launch on September 23, 1935, at Roswell, New Mexico, in an attempt to demonstrate its capabilities to supporters Charles Lindbergh and Harry Guggenheim. The Guggenheim Foundation for the Promotion of Aeronautics funded Goddard's experiments in New Mexico.

A technical problem prevented the flight. But because earlier A-series rocket launches had succeeded, Lindbergh and Guggenheim felt Goddard was on the right track. Lindbergh thus persuaded Goddard to donate a complete A-series rocket to the Smithsonian, which he did in November 1935. This rocket became the first liquid-fuel rocket in the Smithsonian collections.