Rolls-Royce Merlin R.M. 14S.M. Mk 100 V-12 Engine

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Rolls-Royce Merlin R.M. 14S.M. Mk 100 V-12 Engine

    Formed in 1906 to produce automobiles, Rolls-Royce was asked to begin designing and building aircraft engines at the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Design of the Merlin began in 1933 following the similar Kestrel design. This engine, a developmental prototype in the Merlin 100 series, was built by Rolls-Royce in Derby, England, sometime between June and July 1944. It was a new class of engine, built to higher performance standards for power and altitude.

    1 of 2

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Rolls-Royce Merlin R.M. 14S.M. Mk 100 V-12 Engine

    Type: Reciprocating, V-type, 12 cylinders, pressure liquid cooled, supercharged Power rating: 1,227 kW (1,645 hp) at 3,000 rpm Displacement: 27 L (1,649 cu in.) Bore and Stroke: 137.16 mm (5.4 in.) x 152.4 mm (6 in.) Weight: 778 kg (1,715 lb)

    2 of 2

Display Status:

This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

Formed in 1906 to produce automobiles, Rolls-Royce was asked to begin designing and building aircraft engines at the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Design of the Merlin began in 1933 following the similar Kestrel design. Early Merlin Mk II and Mk III engines, which produced about 7,457 kw (1,000 horsepower), powered Hawker Hurricanes and Supermarine Spitfires in the Battle of Britain. Engine improvements and progress in supercharger performance increased the Merlin's rated power to over 1,715 kW (2,300 horsepower) by the end of the war.

This engine, a developmental prototype in the Merlin 100 series, was built by Rolls-Royce in Derby, England, sometime between June and July 1944. It was a new class of engine, built to higher performance standards for power and altitude. Merlin 100s powered the de Havilland Mosquito, Avro Tudor, and de Havilland Hornet and Sea Hornet. U.S. Packard-built Merlin 100s (V-1650-9 and -11) powered later versions of the North American Mustang.