The Biology of Long-Term Spaceflight

January 25, 2017 | 11:00am - 11:30am
Presented Online

Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth’s atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars.

Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

This program is made possible through the generous support of NASA, and the Skelly Foundation.

Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth’s atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

This program is made possible through the generous support of NASA. 


Additional Teacher Resources

Next Generation Science Standards:

MS-LS1-3 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

MS-LS1-4 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.

MS-LS1-5 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.