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April 08, 2021
AirSpace Season 4, Ep. 5: Say My Name
Have you ever wondered how the stuff in space gets named? These days, there’s one organization that approves and keeps track of ALL of the official names from stars and asteroids to mountains on Mars and geysers on Enceladus. We break down the naming process and some of our favorites on today’s episode!
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AirSpace, a podcast, logo
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April 07, 2021
Philip Van Horn (P.V.H.) Weems: Renaissance Man
Philip Van Horn Weems became a world’s leading expert in navigational techniques for aviators by the late 1920s. So much so that aviation luminaries availed themselves of his navigational instruction. Read about his life and access some of the navigation-related artifacts and archival documents he donated to us.
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Bald man in Navy uniform stands in front of a blackboard holding a book. Blackboard with chalk writing in the background, Celestial navigation globe partially visible at right.
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April 07, 2021
Change is in the Air: Moving Artifacts Back into the Building
The National Air and Space Museum marks an important milestone in its renovation project. Moving artifacts back into the west end of the Museum, which has been under renovation for two years.
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Aircraft hanging in under construction gallery with people in yellow construction vests in the background
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April 06, 2021
Understanding Mind-Bending Black Holes
The concept of black holes isn't new — scientists first theorized their existence in the early 20th century. But in the last few years, our knowledge of black holes has expanded exponentially — from the confirmation of supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies to the first ever image of a black hole captured by the Event Horizon Telescope. 
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Orange and yellow circle indicating magnetic fields of a black hole
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April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
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Eating canned food in space
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April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
Read more
Eating canned food in space
  • Story
April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
Read more
Eating canned food in space
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March 31, 2021
The Vera C. Rubin Observatory and Women of Chilean Astronomy
Initially called the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the Vera C. Rubin Observatory was renamed to honor a pioneer in astronomy, particularly in the field of dark matter. The observatory is perched on Chile’s Cerro Pachón in the foothills of the Andes Mountains and stands as a doorway into exploring the women of Chilean astronomy.
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Vera Rubin and Kent Ford
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March 30, 2021
A Seat in the Cockpit: Recognizing and Replacing Biases with Gender Inclusive Language
Some of the language once used in the early days of human spaceflight has not kept pace with the evolution of America’s space program. We now use "crewed" or "piloted" instead of "manned," for example. The era of “manned” spaceflight ended long ago, and the continued use of this language diminishes and erases six decades of women’s contributions to spaceflight.
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Astronaut Christina Koch (left) poses for a portrait with flight engineer Jessica Meir
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March 28, 2021
Sally Ride: Entrepreneur for Space, Science, and Inclusion
For many, their knowledge of Sally Ride begins and ends at her NASA career and the title of the first American woman in space. After she retired from NASA, Sally Ride utilized her groundbreaking status to launch a variety of business ventures (including Space.com and Sally Ride Science) which would inspire the next generation of astronauts and scientists.
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First Class of Female Astronauts