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Showing 31 - 40 of 1320

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May 23, 2021
Porokoru Patapu “John” Pohe: The first Māori trained as a pilot to serve in the Royal New Zealand Air Force
In the late fall of 1940, a troopship loaded with new pilots fresh out of primary flight school arrived in Vancouver, Canada. Porokoru Patapu “John” Pohe, first Māori trained as a pilot to serve in the Royal New Zealand Air Force, was amongst them. Captured as a prisoner of war, Pohe became involved with the plot for a mass escape from prison camp Stalag Luft III in Żagań, Poland. The 1963 epic film, “The Great Escape,” immortalized the event.
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Handley Page Halifax in flight with clouds and the Earth in the background
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May 18, 2021
New Perspectives of Old Worlds
The upcoming Kenneth C. Griffin Exploring the Planets Gallery at the National Air and Space Museum will give visitors a new perspective on the many worlds within our solar system.
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Rendering of Kenneth C. Griffin Exploring the Planets Gallery at the National Air and Space Museum
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May 16, 2021
The People Behind Astronomical Plates and Notebooks: Project PHaEDRA and the Harvard College Observatory Computers
Astronomers at Harvard’s central observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and its new observatory in Arequipa, Peru, ultimately produced over 500,000 glass plate images of the night sky. Directors of the Harvard College Observatory hired women to study, organize, and care for its immense glass plate collection in Cambridge.
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Group portrait of computers at Harvard College Observatory
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May 13, 2021
AirSpace Season 4, Ep. 7: Art Decade
Did you know the National Air and Space Museum has a huge art collection? Yeah, we keep that secret pretty well. It all STEMs (see what we did there?) from a program organized by NASA beginning in the 1960s where a small number of American artists got tons of access to launch sites, clean rooms, space suits, spacecraft—you name it, they painted it.
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AirSpace, a podcast, logo
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May 10, 2021
Jay I. Kislak World War II in the Air
The new Jay I. Kislak World War II in the Air gallery, scheduled to open in 2025, is being carefully planned to provide a poignant and exciting perspective on World War II aviation for new audiences.
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Jay I. Kislak World War II in the Air gallery
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May 05, 2021
First American In Space: The Flight of Alan B. Shepard
Sixty years ago, on May 5, 1961, a Redstone rocket hurled Alan Shepard’s Mercury capsule, Freedom 7, 116 miles high and 302 miles downrange from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Freedom 7 parachuted into the Atlantic just 15 minutes and 22 seconds later, after attaining a maximum velocity of 5,180 mph. Shepard, a Navy test pilot and NASA astronaut, became the first American to fly in space.
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President John F. Kennedy presents award to Alan Shepard
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April 30, 2021
Light This Candle: What You Need to Know About Alan Shepard's Historic Spaceflight
On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American to travel to space.
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Alan Shepard in Spacesuit before Mercury Launch
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April 28, 2021
Remembering Michael Collins
We look back at the extraordinary life of pilot, astronaut, and statesmen Michael Collins, who has died at the age of 90.
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A man, Michael Collins, in a space suit looking out.
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April 28, 2021
Carrying the Fire
National Air and Space Museum acting director Christopher U. Browne reflects on the life and legacy of one of his predecessors, Apollo 11 astronaut and former Museum director Michael Collins.
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Michael Collins
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April 22, 2021
Earth Day: A Story Of Us
For the first Earth Day in 1970, cartoonist Walt Kelly trenchantly captured the core tension of humanity’s relationship to its home world as expressed through environmentalism and climate change: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”
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Drawing that says "WE HAVE MET THE ENEMY AND HE IS US"