Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

    N15696. Single-engine aerobatic and military trainer biplane. Warner Scarab engine, 185 hp. Flown by Alex Papana, Mike Murphy, and Bevo Howard.

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

    N15696. Single-engine aerobatic and military trainer biplane. Warner Scarab engine, 185 hp. Flown by Alex Papana, Mike Murphy, and Bevo Howard.

    2 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

    N15696. Single-engine aerobatic and military trainer biplane. Warner Scarab engine, 185 hp. Flown by Alex Papana, Mike Murphy, and Bevo Howard.

    3 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

    N15696. Single-engine aerobatic and military trainer biplane. Warner Scarab engine, 185 hp. Flown by Alex Papana, Mike Murphy, and Bevo Howard.

    4 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

    N15696. Single-engine aerobatic and military trainer biplane. Warner Scarab engine, 185 hp. Flown by Alex Papana, Mike Murphy, and Bevo Howard.

    5 of 13

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister Wings

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister Cockpit and Wings

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs. Highlighted in this image are the wings of the Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister.

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    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister Wings

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs. Highlighted in this image are the wings of the Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister.

    11 of 13

    Bücker Bü-133C Jungmeister

     

    The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

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    The Bucker Bu-133C Jungmeister at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    The Bucker Bu-133C Jungmeister, hanging upside down to demonstrate one of the many aerobatic maneuvers it performed during its time as a thrilling air show performer. The photo of the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center also shows the red, white and blue de Havilland-Canada DHC-1A Chipmunk, Pennzoil Special; the second Learjet ever built, hanging to the left; the Global Flyer hanging in the read center; the first Air France Concorde on the floor on the left and the Boeing Stratoliner on the right.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

The Bücker Jungmeister dominated the aerobatic scene in Europe and the United States from the mid-1930s through the 1940s. Introduced in 1935 by Carl Bücker as a single-seat version of the Bü 131 A Jungmann, a two-place advanced aerobatic trainer, the Jungmeister became a favorite of European flying clubs.

Romanian pilot Alex Papana brought this Jungmeister to the United States crated in the airship Hindenburg and flew it at the 1937 Cleveland Air Races. Mike Murphy reregistered the airplane as his own and flew it to win the 1938 and '40 American Aerobatic Championships. Beverly "Bevo" Howard then bought it and won the '46 and '47 championships. Howard was killed in an accident in this airplane in 1971, but his estate restored the Jungmeister and donated it to the Smithsonian in 1973.