Command Module, Apollo 13

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Command Module, Apollo 13

    Conical-shaped spacecraft; heat shield on blunt base; one hatch; five windows: docking device in nose.

    1 of 3

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Command Module, Apollo 13

    Conical-shaped spacecraft; heat shield on blunt base; one hatch; five windows: docking device in nose.

    2 of 3

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Command Module, Apollo 13

    Conical-shaped spacecraft; heat shield on blunt base; one hatch; five windows: docking device in nose.

    3 of 3

Display Status:

This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

Apollo 13, the third scheduled manned lunar landing, was launched on April 11, 1970, from Kennedy Space Center. The crewmembers were Commander James Lovell, Lunar Module Pilot Fred Haise, and Command Module Pilot Jack Swigert. Swigert had replaced Tom Mattingly just 72 hours before launch when it was discovered that Mattingly had been exposed to German measles and was not immune. As the astronauts were about 80,000 km from the moon, an explosion occurred in the Service Module of Command Module 109, "Odyssey". The electrical power and water in "Odyssey" was lost, so the lunar landing was aborted. "Odyssey" was powered down and the three men moved into the two-man lunar module, "Aquarius". There they conserved food and fuel during the trip around the moon and back to Earth. The Lunar Module descent engine was used to place the spacecraft on a landing trajectory and to speed up the return. Just before re-entry, the astronauts returned to the Command Module and jettisoned the crippled Service Module. Then they jettisoned "Aquarius", which was not designed for atmospheric re-entry, and safely landed in the Pacific Ocean on April 17.