Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    The Wildcat in the National Air and Space Museum, Navy Bureau of Aeronautics serial number 15392, is the four-hundredth FM-1 built at the Linden, New Jersey, Eastern Aircraft Division plant. The Navy accepted it on July 21, 1943, and it operated almost entirely from Naval Air Station Norman, Oklahoma. After thirteen months of service, the Navy struck the fighter from the active roster and placed it in storage. It was transferred to the National Air and Space Museum in 1960.

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps.

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is the landing gear of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is the engine of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is the engine of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is a wing of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is the landing gear of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is a wing of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. Highlighted in this image is the rear wheel of the Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat

    Single engine, mid-wing, carrier-based fighter aircraft. Wing Span 1,160 cm (457 in.), Length 880 cm (347 in.), Height 450 cm (177 in.), Weight 2,612 kg (5,759 lb)

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    Grumman F4F (FM-1) Wildcat

    The Grumman F4F (FM-1) Wildcat on display in the Sea-Air Operations gallery at the Museum on the National Mall.
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    Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the Eastern Division FM-1 (Grumman F4F-4) Wildcat.

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Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. By 1942 every American Navy fighter squadron flew the F4F. Wildcat pilots encountered Japanese pilots flying the Mitsubishi A6M Zero (see NASM collection) more than any other enemy aircraft. The Zero could outmaneuver the F4F, but the Wildcat's heavy armament and solid construction gave it an advantage when flown by skilled pilots.

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