Grumman G-21 Goose

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    Grumman G-21 Goose

    49ft. span, 38ft. gin. long, 16ft. 2in. high; empty weight 5,425 lbs.; World War II.

    1 of 5

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Grumman G-21 Goose

    49ft. span, 38ft. gin. long, 16ft. 2in. high; empty weight 5,425 lbs.; World War II.

    2 of 5

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Grumman G-21 Goose

    49ft. span, 38ft. gin. long, 16ft. 2in. high; empty weight 5,425 lbs.; World War II.

    3 of 5

    Grumman G-21 Goose Cabin Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the cabin of the Grumman G-21 Goose.

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    Grumman G-21 Goose Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the cockpit of the Grumman G-21 Goose.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

First flown in 1937, the G-21 Goose was Grumman's first single-wing aircraft, its first twin-engine aircraft, and its first aircraft used as a commercial airliner. Capable of alighting on water or land, this remarkable aircraft has served for many decades in a variety of roles that have confirmed the strength and durability of its original design.

The G-21 was designed as an "air yacht" for wealthy New York businessmen, so they could commute from their homes on Long Island to their Manhattan offices. It soon found a market as an airliner, military transport, and utility aircraft. After World War II, small airlines in Alaska, the Caribbean, and California adopted G-21s. This Goose flew with several airlines before the Naval Aviation Museum acquired it and later transferred it to the Smithsonian. Buehler Aviation Research of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, restored it.