Horten Ho 229 V3

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    Horten Ho 229 V3

    WW II; twin jet engines; delta shape; steel fuselage with wood coverage.

    1 of 27

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    Horten Ho 229 V3

    WW II; twin jet engines; delta shape; steel fuselage with wood coverage.

    2 of 27

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

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    Horten Ho 229 V3

    WW II; twin jet engines; delta shape; steel fuselage with wood coverage.

    3 of 27

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

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    Horten Ho 229 V3

    WW II; twin jet engines; delta shape; steel fuselage with wood coverage.

    4 of 27

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Horten Ho 229 V3

    WW II; twin jet engines; delta shape; steel fuselage with wood coverage.

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    Horten from Aft

    The Horten Ho 229 V3 from the aft. 

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    Horten Rusted Left Fairings

    This overall view of the Horten Ho 229 V3 highlights the heavily rusted intake fairing on the left.

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    Tail of Horten

    The tail of the Horten Ho 229 V3 shows the presence of a green paint on the exterior of the aircraft. 

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    Horten H IX V3

    Center section of the Horten Ho 229.

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    Horten H IX V3

    Center section of the Horten H IX V3 at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland.
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    Horten H IX V3 Acrylic

    Close up of the acrylic canopy being analyzed by our conservation staff and Smithsonian's Museum Conservation Institute (MCI).
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    Horten Ho 229 V3 On Steel Stand

    Museum staff fabricated a steel stand to support and protect the center-section of the aircraft during transit.

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    Conservation Treatment of Horten

    Museum conservators treat various parts of the Horten Ho 229 V3.

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    Horten at the Restoration Hangar

    The center section of the Horten Ho 229 V3 is prepared for preservation work at the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar.

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    Horten Prepared for Transport

    The Horten Ho 229 V3 aircraft is prepared for transport from the Paul E. Garber Facility to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Museum in Virginia.

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    Unassembled Horten

    Left 1/4 front view of unassembled Horten Ho 229 V3. 

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    Aircraft Mechanic Works on Horten

    Aircraft mechanic Karl Heinzel stabilizes hardware on the leading edges of the Horten Ho 229 V3. 

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    Horten H IX V3 (Horten 229)

    Horten H IX V3 (Horten 229)
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    Horten H IX V3

    Center section of the Horten H IX V3 at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland.

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    Horten H IX V3

    Center section of the Horten H IX V3 at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland.
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    Horten H IX V3

    Center section of the Horten H IX V3 at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland.
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    Horten H IX V3 Wings

    Wings of the Horten H IX V3 at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland.
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    Horten H IX V3

    Artisans have built airplanes with plywood since well before World War I because crossing each layer, or ply, counters the weakness of a single sheet when bent with the grain rather than across the grain (Melvin Wachowiak /Smithsonian MCI photo).
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    Horten H IX V3

    Artisans have built airplanes with plywood since well before World War I because crossing each layer, or ply, counters the weakness of a single sheet when bent with the grain rather than across the grain (Melvin Wachowiak /Smithsonian MCI photo).
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    Horten H IX V3

    A robust network of welded steel tubing frames the right outer edge of the Horten H IX V3 center section.  Behind the tubing lies a maze of plumbing for one of the Jumo 004 jet engines, the fuel system, and other equipment (Melvin Wachowiak /Smithsonian MCI photo).
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    Horten H IX V3

    German artisans formed the wood around the nose of the Horten H IX center section using steam to make it soft and pliable, and then bending it to shape. 
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    Horten from 1950

    This photograph by Kenneth S. Kik shows the outer wing panels attached to the center section of the Horten Ho 229 V3. Photo taken 1950.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

In 1943 the all-wing and jet-propelled Horten Ho 229 ('aitch-oh-two-two-nine') promised spectacular performance and the German air force (Luftwaffe) chief, Hermann Göring, allocated half-a-million Reich Marks to the brothers Reimar and Walter Horten to build and fly several prototypes. Numerous technical problems beset this unique design and the only powered example crashed after several test flights but the airplane remains one of the most unusual combat aircraft tested during World War II.