La Caisse de Balons ou Les Commis Effrayes

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    Print, Etching on Paper, Hand Colored, LA CAISSE DE BALONS OU LES COMMIS EFFRAYES

    La Caisse de Balons ou Les Commis Effrayes La caisse de balons, A satirical print based on an article from the Journal du France, 30 September (or November) 1783. Print shows six men in front of a castle-like building fumbling over thirteen balloons that were released from a box. This lampoon shows a Belgian merchant trying to sneak model balloons past customs at the border, with his contraband, however, accidentally escaping before the astonished eyes of the smuggler and the customs agent. Toy sized balloon models called "balloonlettes" were very popular and in great demand in Europe. They were made of scraped animal skins that were filled with hydrogen and sold by street vendors. Benjamin Franklin was an early fan of balloonlettes.

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This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

The Birth of Flight: NASM Collections

The invention of the balloon struck the men and women of the late 18th century like a thunderbolt. Enormous crowds gathered in Paris to watch one balloon after another rise above the city rooftops, carrying the first human beings into the air in the closing months of 1783.The excitement quickly spread to other European cities where the first generation of aeronauts demonstrated the wonder of flight. Everywhere the reaction was the same. In an age when men and women could fly, what other wonders might they achieve.

"Among all our circle of friends," one observer noted, "at all our meals, in the antechambers of our lovely women, as in the academic schools, all one hears is talk of experiments, atmospheric air, inflammable gas, flying cars, journeys in the sky." Single sheet prints illustrating the great events and personalities in the early history of ballooning were produced and sold across Europe. The balloon sparked new fashion trends and inspired new fads and products. Hair and clothing styles, jewelry, snuffboxes, wallpaper, chandeliers, bird cages, fans, clocks, chairs, armoires, hats, and other items, were designed with balloon motifs.

Thanks to the generosity of several generations of donors, the National Air and Space Museum maintains one of the world's great collections of objects and images documenting and celebrating the invention and early history of the balloon. Visitors to the NASM's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles International Airport can see several display cases filled with the riches of this collection. We are pleased to provide visitors to our web site with access to an even broader range of images and objects from this period. We invite you to share at least a small taste of the excitement experienced by those who witness the birth of the air age.

Tom D. Crouch

Senior Curator, Aeronautics

National Air and Space Museum