Lunchbox, Lindbergh, King Collection

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    Lunchbox, Lindbergh, King Collection

    A rectangular lunch box that shifts in color from yellow at the bottom to orange at the top. An orange handle is attached just below the lid in the center of the box. The lid is orange in color and hinged along one of the longer sides and features a black silhouette image of an airplane that resembles the Spirit of St. Louis. The four sides of the box are decorated with black silhouettes of figures such as a cowboy riding on top of a horse, three figures wearing Native American headdresses gathered around a teepee and fire, four children with a balloon and a small dog and a woman lying down on the stern of a boat with a square sail. The inside of the box is silver in color with rust and signs of wear.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Lunchbox, Lindbergh, King Collection

    A rectangular lunch box that shifts in color from yellow at the bottom to orange at the top. An orange handle is attached just below the lid in the center of the box. The lid is orange in color and hinged along one of the longer sides and features a black silhouette image of an airplane that resembles the Spirit of St. Louis. The four sides of the box are decorated with black silhouettes of figures such as a cowboy riding on top of a horse, three figures wearing Native American headdresses gathered around a teepee and fire, four children with a balloon and a small dog and a woman lying down on the stern of a boat with a square sail. The inside of the box is silver in color with rust and signs of wear.

    2 of 2

Display Status:

This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

On May 20-21, 1927, Charles Lindbergh literally flew into history when he crossed the Atlantic Ocean in his Ryan NYP Spirit of St. Louis, thus becoming the first pilot to fly solo and nonstop from New York to Paris. This flight made Lindbergh a household name and catapulted him into fame and celebrity. The objects of popular culture in the National Collection display everything from ashtrays to wristwatches reflect the public adulation for Lindbergh and the powerful commercial response to his celebrity. More than 75 years after the Spirit's historic flight, Lindbergh's name still has the power help sell manufactured goods.