Hs 293 A-1 Missile

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    Hs 293 A-1 Missile

    Winged glide-bomb missile, painted gray, with cutaway fuselage skin; brass-colored rocket pod attached underneath.

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    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive.

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    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile Wing Interior

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. Highlighted in this image is a wing on the Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile.

    3 of 7

    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile Vertical Stabilizer and Rockets

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. Highlighted in this image are a vertical stabilizer and rockets on the Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile.

    4 of 7

    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile Vertical Stabilizer

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. Highlighted in this image is a vertical stabilizer on the Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile.

    5 of 7

    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile Rocket Engine

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. Highlighted in this image is a rocket engine on the Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile.

    6 of 7

    Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile Pressure Gauge

     

    Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. Highlighted in this image is a pressure gauge on the Henschel Hs 293 A-1 Air-to-Surface Missile.

    7 of 7

Germany developed the Hs 293 air-launched missile in World War II for use against ships or ground targets. It was basically a glide bomb assisted by a liquid-fuel rocket that fired for 10 seconds. The Hs 293 was carried under the wings or in the bomb bay of an He 111, He 177, Fw 200, or Do 217 aircraft. Its warhead was a modified SC 500 bomb containing Trialene 105 high explosive. A bombardier guided the missile by means of a joy stick and radio control.

Beginning in mid-1943, Hs 293s sank several Allied ships, mostly in the Mediterranean theater. Although Germany developed many experimental versions, only the Hs 293 A-1 was produced in quantity.