Schweizer SGU 2-22EK

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    Schweizer SGU 2-22EK

    Sailplane used by Scotty McCray for aerobatics, silver, red and blue; ca. 1960.

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Schweizer SGU 2-22EK

    Sailplane used by Scotty McCray for aerobatics, silver, red and blue; ca. 1960.

    2 of 3

    Schweizer SGU 2-22EK

     

    Immediately after World War II ended, Earnest Schweizer designed the SGU 2-22EK. Earnest and his brothers, Paul and William, hoped to produce and sell an inexpensive, easy-to-fly, two-seat training glider built from aluminum that could operate from small airfields. The Schweizer Aircraft Corporation built 257 examples of the 2-22 from 1946 to 1967.

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This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

Immediately after World War II ended, Earnest Schweizer designed the SGU 2-22EK. Earnest and his brothers, Paul and William, hoped to produce and sell an inexpensive, easy-to-fly, two-seat training glider built from aluminum that could operate from small airfields. The Schweizer Aircraft Corporation built 257 examples of the 2-22 from 1946 to 1967. Thousands of people acquired the skill to fly motorless aircraft at the controls of the 2-22 and many of these airplanes remain active in 2003.

Byron G. "Scotty" McCray flew this Schweizer 2-22EK from 1966 to 1973 at airshows in the United States, Canada, and the Bahamas. His routine began at about 760-912 m (2,500-3,000 ft). After releasing from the tow airplane, McCray looped, rolled, and spun the 2-22 down to a silent landing. He synchronized his maneuvers to the theme music from the Hollywood film Born Free while audiences heard the melody booming through the airshow public address system.