Skeet (KDC-2)

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    Skeet (KDC-2)

    Conventional, low wing monoplane, cigar shaped fuselage, with front air scoop, fuel tanks under each of its two straight edged wings, and three vertically mounted rectangular rear control surfaces. Red with white stripe; design for internally-mounted pulsejet engine. Internally, contains two batteries, one on each side, in front of drone, each a black rectangular box and each with seven rods protruding upwards, with adjacent white plastic insulated electric wires; square box in middle between the two batteries, possibly the radio receiver. Contains two standard Victor Welding Co. pressure gauges on right front compartment, with blue fittings (see Marks). This Skeet does not contain its internal pulsejet engine with pulsejet grill. Fuel tanks, each, length, 67 inches; diameter, 20 inches; each fuel tank holds 35 gallons, 17.5 gallons forward and 17.5 gallons aft for each tank.

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This object is on display in the Rockets & Missiles at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Rockets & Missiles

The Skeet, also designated KD2C-2, was a pulsejet-powered, air-launched expendable U.S. Navy drone designed for conventional fleet gunnery training. It was unusual in that its pulsejet was internally mounted. The endurance of the drone was 30 minutes and top speed was 300 knots.

The Skeet project was started in 1945 by the Curtiss-Wright Airplane Company, and their first experimental model was produced in 1947. The internally mounted pulsejet arrangement was found unsatisfactory since it produced low speed and high fuel consumption in both wind tunnel and flight tests at the Navy's Missile Test Center at Point Mugu, California. The project was cancelled in 1949. The Skeet was donated to the Smithsonian in 1971 by the U.S. Navy.