Sportwings Valkyrie

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    Sportwings Valkyrie

    Flight instructor William H. Wolf designed the Valkyrie specifically for pilots who wished to fly over the flat terrain of the Mid-West. Wolf was dissatisfied with the flying qualities of the standard Rogallo wing hang glider, which lacked the performance needed for flatland flying. The Valkyrie wing was long and thin and slightly swept, and both leading and trailing edges ran straight from root to wingtip. To aid longitudinal and lateral stability, Wolf used seven degrees of wing dihedral. Steel cables braced the wings and steadied the pilot who sat in a swing seat and controlled pitch by shifting his or her weight fore and aft.

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This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

Flight instructor William H. Wolf designed the Valkyrie specifically to fly well above the flat terrain of the Mid-West. Wolf was dissatisfied with the flying qualities of the standard Rogallo wing hang glider. He studied books on aerodynamics and aircraft construction and then designed a monoplane glider that was easy to build, lightweight, and handled well in the air. Wolf's design was considerably different from the sharply-swept, short-span Rogallo wing. The Valkyrie wing was long and thin and slighty swept, and both leading and trailing edges ran straight from root to wingtip. To aid longitudinal and lateral stability, Wolf used seven degrees of wing dihedral. Steel cables braced the wings and steadied the pilot who sat in a swing seat and controlled pitch by shifting his or her weight fore and aft. The pilot deflected drag rudders suspended from each wing tip to turn the aircraft. Victor D. Powell, past President of the United States Hang Glider Association (USHGA), donated the Valkyrie to the National Air and Space Museum on March 16, 1978.