Tiny Tim Missile

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    Tiny Tim Missile

    Long cylinder with threaded rounded nose and 4 cruciform tail fins attached at bottom by bands. The threaded base plate contains 24 exhaust nozzles place around a safety burst disc made of copper; two electrical leads for ignition, with transpararent plastic insulation, leading from back of nozzle. The body is partly cutaway to show a portion of the four solid-fuel propellant sticks which are each cross or cruciform-shaped to provided greater burning area and therefore more thrust. The propellant sticks, also called "grains," are of wood but painted the same black color as the real grains; felt in front of propellant grain simulations. Silver body with blue-green nose. Overall, painted battleship gray.

    1 of 4

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Tiny Tim Missile

    Long cylinder with threaded rounded nose and 4 cruciform tail fins attached at bottom by bands. The threaded base plate contains 24 exhaust nozzles place around a safety burst disc made of copper; two electrical leads for ignition, with transpararent plastic insulation, leading from back of nozzle. The body is partly cutaway to show a portion of the four solid-fuel propellant sticks which are each cross or cruciform-shaped to provided greater burning area and therefore more thrust. The propellant sticks, also called "grains," are of wood but painted the same black color as the real grains; felt in front of propellant grain simulations. Silver body with blue-green nose. Overall, painted battleship gray.

    2 of 4

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Tiny Tim Missile

    Long cylinder with threaded rounded nose and 4 cruciform tail fins attached at bottom by bands. The threaded base plate contains 24 exhaust nozzles place around a safety burst disc made of copper; two electrical leads for ignition, with transpararent plastic insulation, leading from back of nozzle. The body is partly cutaway to show a portion of the four solid-fuel propellant sticks which are each cross or cruciform-shaped to provided greater burning area and therefore more thrust. The propellant sticks, also called "grains," are of wood but painted the same black color as the real grains; felt in front of propellant grain simulations. Silver body with blue-green nose. Overall, painted battleship gray.

    3 of 4

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Tiny Tim Missile

    Long cylinder with threaded rounded nose and 4 cruciform tail fins attached at bottom by bands. The threaded base plate contains 24 exhaust nozzles place around a safety burst disc made of copper; two electrical leads for ignition, with transpararent plastic insulation, leading from back of nozzle. The body is partly cutaway to show a portion of the four solid-fuel propellant sticks which are each cross or cruciform-shaped to provided greater burning area and therefore more thrust. The propellant sticks, also called "grains," are of wood but painted the same black color as the real grains; felt in front of propellant grain simulations. Silver body with blue-green nose. Overall, painted battleship gray.

    4 of 4

Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

The Tiny Tim air-to-ground missile was the largest American rocket in service during World War II. It weighed 1,250 pounds (567 kg.) and was also designated the 11.75-inch aircraft rocket (its diameter or caliber). The TNT warhead weighed 148.5 lbs (67.3 kg.), which could destroy coastal defense guns, pill boxes, bridges, tanks, and ships. The missile was primarily used by a Marine Corps Air Group and was mounted on F4U aircraft.

Tiny Tims sunk at least one Japanese ship and seriously damaged another. During the Korean War, one Tiny Tim knocked out a key bridge. Visible in this partial cutaway are simulated solid-propellant sticks and the rocket's 24 exhaust nozzles. This object was donated to the Smithsonian by the U.S. Navy in 1964.