Topic

All Stories

Showing 1 - 10 of 916
Mon, March 27 2017

Building the First Operational Jet Fighter

The Messerschmitt 262 was the first operational jet fighter introduced by Nazi Germany during World War II. It was more than 100 miles per hour faster than any other Allied fighter aircraft. Despite this, the Messerschmitt 262 faced problems. There were not enough resources to build the aaircraft and competition with other manufacturers was steep.  Nazi Germany turned to forced labor to build the Messerschmitt 262. An example of this was at the Gusen II concentration camp, where prisoners built the fuselages for the aircraft. Gusen II was known as the “Hell of Hell,” and records estimate that 8,000 to 20,000 people died there.  Although 1,443 aircraft were completed, it is estimated that only about 300 saw combat. The Messerschmitt 262 was introduced too late in the war to compete against the Allies.

Read More about Building the First Operational Jet Fighter
favorite
Messerschmitt Me 262
Thu, March 23 2017

Ivan Ivanovich and the Persistent Lost Cosmonaut Conspiracy

Before humans flew into space, dogs, chimpanzees, and flight-test dummies led the way. Ivan Ivanovich, who flew in the Soviet Korabl-Sputnik program in the early 1960s, was one such dummy. In a heady atmosphere of Cold War tension, Soviet secrecy, and uncertainty about the dawning space age, garbled retellings of Ivan's extraordinary story helped foster one of the most tenacious Space Age conspiracy theories: The Lost Cosmonaut Theory.

Read More about Ivan Ivanovich and the Persistent Lost Cosmonaut Conspiracy
favorite
Test Flight Mannequin named "Ivan Ivanovich" in Space Race
Wed, March 22 2017

Wiley Post's Long-Distance Records in the Winnie Mae

Wiley Post set a number of records in the Winnie Mae, a Lockheed Vega. He and his navigator flew around the world in eight days. Then, he took the same trip by himself and took seven days. Post also worked with BFGoodrich to develop the world’s first pressure suit in order to fly above 50,000 feet and set more records.

Read More about

Wiley Post's Long-Distance Records in the Winnie Mae

favorite
Lockheed Vega 5C Winnie Mae - Time and Navigation
Tue, March 21 2017

Cassini’s Grand Finale

The Cassini spacecraft has spent almost 13 years exploring the beautiful giant planet Saturn and its amazingly diverse moons. Cassini’s mission will end in September when it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere, but it will leave behind a wealth of knowledge and wonder.

Read More about Cassini’s Grand Finale
favorite
Saturn Captured by the Cassini Spacecraft
Thu, March 16 2017

One Scientist's Journey from Washing Pots to Studying Planets

Dr. Tom Barclay is a senior research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. He spends his days studying stars and planets and how they formed. But before he became a scientist, he had all kinds of jobs from cleaning toilets to washing pots. He’s got some great advice about finding your own path.

Read More about One Scientist's Journey from Washing Pots to Studying Planets
favorite
Kepler-10 System
Wed, March 15 2017

The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft

Howard Hawks directed a film in 1930 whose influence can be seen in virtually every military aviation movie made since it premiered. The Dawn Patrol, with its dramatic aerial combat scenes and heroic and tragic pilot figures, is the father of all military aviation films. We will be screening The Dawn Patrol and providing commentary on March 17 as part of our Hollywood Goes to War: World War I on the Big Screen, film series.

Read More about The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft
favorite
The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft
Tue, March 14 2017

The F-1 Engine and the Conquest of Space

“A rocket engine is a controlled explosion. So there’s this tension between pushing the technological state of the art and also maintaining safety and reliability," Curator Tom Lassman The F-1 engine remains the highest thrust rocket engine that NASA has ever flown (1.5 million pounds of thrust). The liquid-fueled engine was used during the Apollo program and sat at the bottom of the Saturn V. The engines were designed to be disposable. After reaching a certain altitude, the engines would shut down and fall back into the ocean.  When the Saturn V was taken out of service, NASA shifted from disposable rocketry to reusable rocketry. In recent years, NASA has revisited the F-1 to help inform the next generation of launch vehicles like the Space Launch System (SLS). 

Read More about The F-1 Engine and the Conquest of Space
favorite
F-1 rocket engines in Apollo to the Moon
Fri, March 10 2017

Exploring Science in a Balloon

In the early years of the balloon, explorers employed the lighter-than-air craft to probe the upper reaches of the atmosphere, or float across the arctic wastes in an attempt to reach the North Pole.

Read More about Exploring Science in a Balloon
favorite
Etching
Thu, March 9 2017

NASA Leader Explains Why Failure is Sometimes an Option

From January 2015 to 2017, Dava Newman served as NASA’s deputy administrator. Newman helped lead the organization forward and provided direction on policy and planning. How does someone attain such an important role?

Read More about NASA Leader Explains Why Failure is Sometimes an Option
favorite
Dava Newman, Former NASA Deputy Administrator
Wed, March 8 2017

Five Inspiring Women in Aerospace History from Around the World

Today, like many of you, we’re celebrating International Women’s Day. Women around the world have meaningfully contributed to the aerospace industry, from groundbreaking research to daring flights. Here are just a few of those inspiring women.  

Read More about Five Inspiring Women in Aerospace History from Around the World
favorite
Patricia Cowings

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More