All Stories

Showing 1 - 10 of 968
Tue, June 20 2017

Our Favorite Sports Stories for #sportsMW

What do baseball, hockey, and football have in common? Hint: It’s more than just the roar of the crowd or competitive all-star athletes. Each sporting event has some connection to aviation and spaceflight—yes, spaceflight. Our intrepid archivist, Elizabeth Borja, has been exploring this connection for years. Whether it’s the testing of spacesuits at a baseball game or the New York Yankees flying on a Douglas DC-4, Borja has uncovered surprising sports stories filed away in the Museum’s Archives. Here are our five, all-time-favorite stories in honor of today’s #MuseumWeek theme: sports (#sportsMW).

Read More about Our Favorite Sports Stories for #sportsMW
favorite
New York Yankees Baseball Team
Thu, June 15 2017

The Eagle and the Hawk

Although less well known than Wings, The Dawn Patrol, and Hell’s Angels, The Eagle and the Hawk was one of the best World War I dramas of the 1930s.  Based on an original story by John Monk Saunders, who also wrote the original story for Wings, The Eagle and the Hawk focuses on the psychological aspects of wartime aerial combat.  It explores the cumulative effects on pilots and crews who fought in the skies during World War I, rather than on the romanticized heroic exploits of fighter pilots.

Read More about The Eagle and the Hawk
favorite
The Eagle and the Hawk
Wed, June 14 2017

Advice From An Eclipse Chaser

As a volunteer at the National Air and Space Museum, I’ve been talking to visitors about astronomy for 28 years. Right now is an exciting time to be volunteering here thanks to the total solar eclipse that will happen this summer. As an astronomy enthusiast and an eclipse chaser, I have some great advice to share on how best to view the 2017 eclipse. 

Read More about Advice From An Eclipse Chaser
favorite
Volunteer Attends 1991 Solar Eclipse
Fri, June 9 2017

The Saga of Writing in Space

From dashing off a quick note to creating painstaking calligraphy, we often take writing for granted. But in space, where the stakes are high, how does one write? After all, the ink in pens isn’t held down by gravity, so how do you write upside down? 

Read More about The Saga of Writing in Space
favorite
Knee Note Pad : Friendship 7
Wed, June 7 2017

What the Next Astronaut Class Can Learn From Veteran Space Travelers

My threshold for thrill-seeking ends at the Cyclone on Coney Island. It’s why astronauts have always captivated me. They are people who have said YES to travelling around the Earth at a top speed of 28,000 kilometers (17,500 miles) per hour; YES to being strapped to a launch vehicle that can consume more than 1.59 million kilograms (3.5 million pounds) of fuel in just 8 ½ minutes; and YES to calling the vacuum of space home for increasingly longer periods of time. They have made a career out of taking calculated risks. And they have worked tirelessly and competed aggressively to do so.

Read More about What the Next Astronaut Class Can Learn From Veteran Space Travelers
favorite
NASA Astronaut Class 2017
Mon, June 5 2017

A Brief History of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems

Last week a United States’ “hit-to-kill vehicle” intercepted and destroyed a mock intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) for the first time during a test. Until fifteen years ago, however, anti-ballistic missiles (ABMs) like the one just tested were banned under the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty signed by the United States and Soviet Union in 1972.   

Read More about A Brief History of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems
favorite
Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle Model
Fri, June 2 2017

Former Lake Environment on Mars Might Hold Clues to Life Beyond Earth

When John Grant was only 16, the Viking landers were sent to Mars. Today, Grant  helps lead the operation groups controlling two Mars rovers,  Opportunity and Curiosity, as a geologist at the National Air and Space Museum’s Center for Earth and Planetary Studies. Recent data collected by Curiosity and published in Science describes an ancient lake environment located at Gale Crater—an environment Grant, a coauthor of the article, believes holds further clues to whether there was ever life on the Red Planet.

Read More about Former Lake Environment on Mars Might Hold Clues to Life Beyond Earth
favorite
Curiosity's Selfie
Wed, May 31 2017

Hubble Trouble: Repairing the Hubble Space Telescope

The first images produced by the Hubble Space Telescope were fuzzy and unclear due to a problem with its optical system. While the media had a field day with this “Hubble Trouble,” NASA had an opportunity to prove that they could fix the telescope in orbit, a task that was uniquely incorporated into the Hubble’s design. Astronauts were able to repair the telescope, and soon after, the Hubble Space Telescope was producing stellar images.

Read More about Hubble Trouble: Repairing the Hubble Space Telescope
favorite
Hubble Test Telescope
Thu, May 25 2017

A New Way to Search our Technical Files

Until recently, our largest and most-used archival collection, The Technical Reference Files, did not have an online finding aid. As the majority of the Archives Department’s public reference requests (of which we receive over 2,300 a year) can be answered using material in these files, we are delighted to finally enable researchers to search the listings of this valuable collection.

Read More about A New Way to Search our Technical Files
favorite
Example of Technical Files
Tue, May 23 2017

The First Significant Anti-War Movie

All Quiet on the Western Front, based on the 1929 novel of the same name by Erich Maria Remarque, is still considered one of the best films ever made in the war movie genre. Released in 1930, All Quiet on the Western Front was a reflection of the profound disillusionment with war in the post-World War I (WWI) era. It was the first significant anti-war movie, exploring the war’s physical and psychological impact on a generation lost to war.

Read More about The First Significant Anti-War Movie
favorite
The First Significant Anti-War Movie

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More