Topic

Early Flight

Showing 1 - 10 of 56
Fri, August 23 2019

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.12
Every Rose Has Its Thorn

Today on the show, we tackle the meaning of life. Well… not really. But definitely matters of consequence. 

Read More about

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.12
Every Rose Has Its Thorn

favorite
Wed, January 18 2017

Crossing the Channel in a Balloon

Ballooning had wide-spread popularity in France during the 18th century, but English intellectuals were initially skeptical about the balloon’s utility. At the request of King George III, French experimenter François Pierre Ami Argand flew a small hydrogen balloon from Windsor Castle in November 1783, the first such flight in England.

Read More about Crossing the Channel in a Balloon
favorite
Mon, December 5 2016

Exploring the History of our Chinese Kite Collection

In 1876, after the dust from the United States’ first World’s Fair and Centennial Exposition settled on the grounds of Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, the Smithsonian Institution’s collections expanded exponentially. Sixty boxcars filled with art, mechanical inventions, and other materials from many of the 37 countries who participated in the Exposition pulled into Washington, DC as gifts for a brand new museum.

Read More about Exploring the History of our Chinese Kite Collection
favorite
Tue, November 8 2016

Stories from Inside the Spirit of St. Louis

Working on the Museum’s Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall gave us a unique opportunity to take a close look at many of the objects that have been on display since the gallery opened in 1976. The renovation of the gallery also allowed our photographers a rare opportunity to capture some very unique views of our aircraft, inside and out. This close inspection helped us uncover and rediscover interesting stories and facts. This is true of the Spirit of St. Louis, the aircraft that Charles Lindbergh famously piloted across the Atlantic.

Read More about

Stories from Inside the Spirit of St. Louis

favorite
Mon, October 31 2016

Frightful Early Flight Gear

Still seeking Halloween inspiration? We’re drawing spooky inspiration from our archives. These photos document early attempts at protecting aviators and their support crews. The results, while practical, were often quite creepy. 

Read More about Frightful Early Flight Gear
favorite
Fri, October 21 2016

Your Captions: Merrill and Princess Doreen

Last week we asked you to caption a number of intriguing images, and we promised to share more about each photo in the coming weeks. Let’s kick off with this ferociously furry snapshot.

Read More about Your Captions: Merrill and Princess Doreen
favorite
Wed, September 28 2016

1909: Flight Around the Statue of Liberty

Today in 1909, Wilbur Wright flew around the Statue of Liberty as part of the New York Hudson-Fulton Celebration, resulting in this historic Harper’s Weekly cover page. 

Read More about 1909: Flight Around the Statue of Liberty
favorite
Mon, September 5 2016

The 1924 Central Labor Union Trophy Race

On September 5, 1882, the Central Labor Union in New York City held a “monster labor festival” in Wendel’s Elm Park, an event that would become known as Labor Day.  On October 2, 1924, the Central Labor Union of Dayton sponsored their own trophy race at the International Air Races in Dayton, Ohio.

Read More about The 1924 Central Labor Union Trophy Race
favorite
Fri, September 2 2016

First Solo Hop

Although her flight is not considered “official,” this day in history we remember Blanche Stuart Scott, the first American woman to take a solo hop into the air.

Read More about First Solo Hop
favorite
Thu, August 25 2016

1932: Amelia Earhart Flies Nonstop Across U.S.

Today in 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the U.S. nonstop. Earhart  piloted her Lockheed Vega 5B from Los Angeles to Newark in a record 19 hours and 5 minutes.

Read More about 1932: Amelia Earhart Flies Nonstop Across U.S.
favorite

Pages