Topic

Behind the Scenes

Showing 1 - 10 of 233
Tue, May 23 2017

The First Significant Anti-War Movie

All Quiet on the Western Front, based on the 1929 novel of the same name by Erich Maria Remarque, is still considered one of the best films ever made in the war movie genre. Released in 1930, All Quiet on the Western Front was a reflection of the profound disillusionment with war in the post-World War I (WWI) era. It was the first significant anti-war movie, exploring the war’s physical and psychological impact on a generation lost to war.

Read More about The First Significant Anti-War Movie
favorite
The First Significant Anti-War Movie
Fri, April 28 2017

The Wow Factor: New NASA Images Library

How does a Museum curator and historian of astronaut photography find the best space photos? Curator Jennifer Levasseur shares all of her tips and tricks and a “new” resource from NASA.

Read More about The Wow Factor: New NASA Images Library
favorite
Tropical Cyclone Debbie Viewed From the ISS
Wed, April 26 2017

How to Replicate a Lunar Module on the Moon 

When the Museum’s Apollo Lunar Module (LM-2) moved to a prominent place in our Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall last year, it was an opportunity for us to examine the artifact in fine detail. We spared no effort to preserve, refurbish, and document the iconic object before it went on display in our central gallery in 2016. With careful research and close examination of photography from the Apollo 11 mission, we have been able to refine the accuracy of the external appearance of our LM-2 to more and more closely represent the appearance of LM-5 (Eagle) on the Moon.

Read More about

How to Replicate a Lunar Module on the Moon 

favorite
Lunar Module 2 (LM-2)
Wed, April 19 2017

Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break

Hell’s Angels, along with Wings and The Dawn Patrol, is considered one of the three great early aviation films that defined the genre. The movie featured authentic aerial combat scenes, innovative camera work, and incredible miniature effects. Upwards of 50 aircraft, nearly half actual World War I airplanes, were assembled for the production, and some 75 pilots were employed to fly the aerial sequences and pilot the camera planes. 

Read More about

Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break

favorite
Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break
Tue, April 11 2017

Inspiration from Women Paving the Way to Mars

Before coming to work at the National Air and Space Museum, I taught for 15 years at Liberty Public Schools near Kansas City, Missouri. When I was teaching, I would write to anyone I thought I could get a response from, including celebrities, asking them for advice for students. My favorite responses were always from astronauts.  

Read More about Inspiration from Women Paving the Way to Mars
favorite
Note from Astronaut Peggy Whitson
Thu, April 6 2017

Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War

On April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I, setting America on a course to become an important player on the world stage. It was a turning point in the nation’s history that still reverberates through world events a century later. The Museum’s centerpiece presentation in observance of the 100th anniversary of World War I is Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War, a new exhibition in the Museum’s Flight in the Arts gallery. A collaboration with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the exhibition features largely never-before-seen artwork, produced by soldiers, that sheds light on World War I in a compelling and very human way.

Read More about Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War
favorite
On the Wire
Fri, March 31 2017

Museum Unveils Declassified Roswell Artifact

The National Air and Space Museum has uncovered a new Roswell artifact that is sure to shed light on the events of 1947 and the age-old question, “Are we alone in the universe?”

Read More about Museum Unveils Declassified Roswell Artifact
favorite
April Fools 2017
Wed, March 15 2017

The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft

Howard Hawks directed a film in 1930 whose influence can be seen in virtually every military aviation movie made since it premiered. The Dawn Patrol, with its dramatic aerial combat scenes and heroic and tragic pilot figures, is the father of all military aviation films. We will be screening The Dawn Patrol and providing commentary on March 17 as part of our Hollywood Goes to War: World War I on the Big Screen, film series.

Read More about The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft
favorite
The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft
Thu, March 9 2017

NASA Leader Explains Why Failure is Sometimes an Option

From January 2015 to 2017, Dava Newman served as NASA’s deputy administrator. Newman helped lead the organization forward and provided direction on policy and planning. How does someone attain such an important role?

Read More about NASA Leader Explains Why Failure is Sometimes an Option
favorite
Dava Newman, Former NASA Deputy Administrator

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More