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Military

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Tue, April 16 2019

The 100th Anniversary of the First Transatlantic Flight: Transcribe the Albert Read NC-4 Collection

In May 1919, the U.S. Navy sponsored three Curtiss flying boats—the NC-1, NC-3, and NC-4—each with a crew of six, in an attempt to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Lt. Commander Albert C. Read commanded the NC-4, the only aircraft to succeed in its mission.  As we prepare to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the NC-4’s historic transatlantic flight, the materials in Read’s collection are available to transcribe in the Smithsonian’s Transcription Center. 

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Thu, April 11 2019

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.3
Hail to the Chief

On this episode of AirSpace we’re talking about the most exclusive form of public transportation – presidential flight. 

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AirSpace Season 2|Ep.3
Hail to the Chief

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Tue, December 25 2018

Christmas at Wright Field

In 1917, the United States Army Air Service established an aviation engineering section at McCook Field in Dayton, Ohio. In 1927, the Engineering Division, as it was then known, moved to nearby Wilbur Wright Field and there remained as the Air Force Material Division (AFMD) and Air Material Command (AMC). Throughout the years, those stationed at Wright Field celebrated the holidays.

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Fri, November 9 2018

Veterans Experience a Journey of Lifetime to Air and Space

The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center was a special stop on the “Journey of Heroes” program, bringing veterans and Holocaust survivors to Washington, DC.

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Fri, July 27 2018

High Adrenaline, High Altitude: HALO Jumps

Featured in the new film Mission: Impossible — Fallout, the HALO jump is a real—and dangerous—military maneuver that’s been used by special forces teams for decades.

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Sat, July 14 2018

The Grave of Quentin Roosevelt

On July 14, 1918, Quentin Roosevelt, son of President Theodore Roosevelt, died outside of Chamery, France, his Nieuport 28 shot down by a German pilot. To American aviators and soldiers, the grave of Quentin Roosevelt became a shrine, his death a touchstone for service and sacrifice, appearing in many World War I era scrapbooks and collections held by the National Air and Space Museum Archives.

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Tue, July 3 2018

Here's Why The US Flag Sometimes Appears Backwards

Is the American flag backwards on the side of Space Shuttle Discovery? No, the “backwards” flag is actually part of the US Flag Code.

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Wed, April 18 2018

A Curator on Configuring WWII Military Medals

Over the years I’ve spent curating the National Air and Space Museum’s uniform and flight clothing collection, I have received many inquiries. One of the most frequently ask questions concerns the placement of Lt. Gen. Jimmy Doolittle's Medal of Honor ribbon on his wartime uniform.

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Fri, April 13 2018

Women Breaking Barriers in the Royal Air Force

Two women of the Royal Air Force share their experiences in the military. 

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Fri, March 9 2018

The Predator, a Drone That Transformed Military Combat

A look at the history and impact of the Predator UAV on military aerial combat.

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