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Wed, April 19 2017

Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break

Hell’s Angels, along with Wings and The Dawn Patrol, is considered one of the three great early aviation films that defined the genre. The movie featured authentic aerial combat scenes, innovative camera work, and incredible miniature effects. Upwards of 50 aircraft, nearly half actual World War I airplanes, were assembled for the production, and some 75 pilots were employed to fly the aerial sequences and pilot the camera planes. 

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Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break

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Hell’s Angels: Hughes' Big Crash & Harlow's Big Break
Tue, April 4 2017

A Film About Bravado, Cowardice, and Redemption During WWI

The latest film in our Hollywood Goes to War: World War I on the Big Screen film series the story of the American Expeditionary Force’s arrival in France in World War I. Based on the real-life exploits of New York City’s 69th Infantry Regiment, The Fighting 69th features several real-life characters.

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A Film About Bravado, Cowardice, and Redemption During WWI

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A Film About Bravado, Cowardice, and Redemption During WWI
Mon, April 3 2017

Baseball in the Archives and Life in Cleveland

Today marks an important day in sports—the official first day of baseball season and the NCAA men’s basketball national championship game.

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YMCA Baseball
Thu, March 23 2017

Ivan Ivanovich and the Persistent Lost Cosmonaut Conspiracy

Before humans flew into space, dogs, chimpanzees, and flight-test dummies led the way. Ivan Ivanovich, who flew in the Soviet Korabl-Sputnik program in the early 1960s, was one such dummy. In a heady atmosphere of Cold War tension, Soviet secrecy, and uncertainty about the dawning space age, garbled retellings of Ivan's extraordinary story helped foster one of the most tenacious Space Age conspiracy theories: The Lost Cosmonaut Theory.

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Test Flight Mannequin named "Ivan Ivanovich" in Space Race
Wed, March 15 2017

The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft

Howard Hawks directed a film in 1930 whose influence can be seen in virtually every military aviation movie made since it premiered. The Dawn Patrol, with its dramatic aerial combat scenes and heroic and tragic pilot figures, is the father of all military aviation films. We will be screening The Dawn Patrol and providing commentary on March 17 as part of our Hollywood Goes to War: World War I on the Big Screen, film series.

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The Dawn Patrol: 1930 WWI Film Features Museum Aircraft
Mon, February 27 2017

Sally Ride: Women’s Firsts in Space and Politics

When the Museum collected objects from Dr. Sally K. Ride's personal collection in 2013, it became clear that Dr. Ride privately say many connections between her history-making spaceflight and the state of American women in politics and public life. Several political buttons found in Dr. Ride's personal desk in her home study tell that story. Curator Margaret Weitekamp shares how these artifacts help tell the full arc of Dr. Ride's life. 

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Sally Ride's ERA Button
Sat, February 25 2017

The Last Time the Command Module Columbia Toured

We announced that the Apollo 11 Command Module “Columbia” will be a part of a national tour starting in October. Did you know this isn’t the spacecraft’s first tour? In 1970-71, NASA executed an ambitious public tour of Apollo 11 artifacts to 49 state capitals, the District of Columbia, and Anchorage, Alaska. The Command Module traveled nearly 26,000 miles for the tour. We share more interesting details of the first tour including which state had the largest crowds.

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The Last Time the Command Module Columbia Toured

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Apollo 11 Tour in Missouri
Mon, February 20 2017

The Balloon in Social and Political Satire

What made the balloon such a key graphic element in political and social satire for over one century? Was it the bulbous shape, or the fact that balloons are wayward craft that tend to go where the wind blows, in spite of the aeronaut’s best efforts? Whatever the reason, the great comic artists of the 18th and 19th century turned to the balloon time and time again in order to poke fun at people and events. The meaning of many of the political satires, the inside joke, is often lost on us today. If any of our friends out there can enlighten us as to the story behind one of these mysteries, we welcome the assistance! 

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Lithograph
Mon, February 20 2017

Katherine Johnson, Hidden Figures, and John Glenn’s Flight

The flight of Friendship 7 has gained new resonance thanks to the movie Hidden Figures. Curator Michael Neufeld examines the movie through the lens of a space historian. Neufeld admits that the movie deviates from history often, but the movie was good, well-acted, inspirational, and important. The movie, and the book it is based on, are destined to change our national narrative about the space program and the people who contributed to it. 

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Hidden Figures Movie Poster
Wed, February 8 2017

Celebrations in the Sky

No celebration in 19th century France was complete without a balloon in the weeks and months following its invention. A balloon ascent had the power to gather crowds of delighted spectators eager to see something they had never seen before. This balloon craze was satirized and documented in prints and engravings from the time. 

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Aeronaut Sophie Blanchard

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