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Science & Engineering

Showing 11 - 20 of 107
Tue, March 6 2018

Breaking Barriers as a Female Fighter Pilot

Pilot Heather Penney reflects on what it means to be a woman in aviation and the commitment it takes to succeed, no matter what the field.

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Pilot Heather "Lucky" Penney
Thu, March 1 2018

Behind the Winter Olympics' Drone Show

A look behind-the-scenes at the development of the 2018 Winter Olympics drone show, from Natalie Cheung, general manager of Intel’s drone light show team. 

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The 2018 Winter Olympics drone show
Fri, February 23 2018

Go for Gold: Olympic Aerodynamics

As you’ve watched the ski jumpers competing in the Winter Olympics, have you ever wondered why they assume the positions they do during the inrun and jump? It’s not just a silly skiing style, it’s aerodynamics in action—and it’s the same rules that impact airplanes in flight.

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A ski jumper competing in the FIS Nordic Combined World Cup
Thu, February 15 2018

Astronaut Victor Glover on the Challenges of NASA Training

What is it like to train as an astronaut? Victor Glover, part of NASA’s 2013 astronaut class, is one of the few who knows what it’s like to prepare for a journey beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

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Victor Glover training at the NASA Neutral Buoyancy Lab
Fri, February 9 2018

Remembering Columbia, Fifteen Years Later

Fifteen years after the Columbia tragedy, Michael D. Leinbach, Space Shuttle Launch Director, and Jonathan H. Ward, space historian, look back at the harrowing process of recovering the spacecraft. 

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Book Cover: Bringing Columbia Home
Fri, January 26 2018

The Missing History of the Explorer 1 Satellite

Sometimes, seeing isn't believing until you take something apart. On the 60th anniversary of the launch of Explorer 1 by the United States, I'm prompted to recall the most valuable lesson I ever learned about what it means to be a curator.

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Explorer 1 (backup)
Wed, December 20 2017

Top Five Stories of 2017

As 2017 comes to a close, let’s revisit some of our favorite stories of the year: stories of solar eclipses, scientific women, the Spitfire, and spacecraft.

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Solar Eclipse
Thu, December 14 2017

That’s no moon. (It's also not the Death Star.)

With its spherical shape and piecemeal construction, it’s easy to see similarities between the Telstar satellite and the infamous Death Star of the Star Wars films. Aside from a passing resemblance in design, both pieces of technology also address a larger question that has been a focal point for humankind in reality and fantasy: what does space mean for humanity?

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Telstar
Tue, December 12 2017

How Astronauts Return to Earth

If you were freefalling back to Earth from space, would you want to rely on a couple of parachutes and some rockets to protect you from crashing? As crazy as it sounds, that is what allows astronauts aboard the Russian Soyuz capsules to safely return to Earth.

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Astronaut Randy Bresnik Aboard the ISS
Mon, December 11 2017

"We Choose to go to the Moon:" JFK's Moon Shot

As the American space program once again looks toward the Moon, we revisit President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 challenge to land a man on the Moon and return him safely to the Earth.

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Apollo 11: Buzz Aldrin and the U.S. flag on the Moon

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