Topic

Science & Engineering

Showing 11 - 20 of 79
Thu, October 5 2017

“Taternauts” and Spacesuits: How Astronauts Stay Safe in Space

The spacesuits that astronauts wear act as their own personal spacerafts--regulating their temperatures, and made to protect them from micrometeorites while outside of the International Space Station. Join the STEM in 30 team as they create their own "space suits" for some astronaut "Taternauts." 

Read More about “Taternauts” and Spacesuits: How Astronauts Stay Safe in Space
favorite
STS-130 EVA - International Space Station Cupola
Tue, October 3 2017

Sputnik and the Space Age at 60

Sputnik, the world’s first human-made satellite of the Earth, was launched on October 4, 1957, marking the beginning of the Space Age and the modern world in which we live today.

Read More about Sputnik and the Space Age at 60
favorite
Sputnik Model in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall
Wed, September 27 2017

Meridiani Planum and the Search for Ice on Mars

If you’re going to Mars, which do you bring: water or a shovel? The question may sound a little tongue-in-cheek, but it actually goes right to the heart of a critical need for future human exploration of Mars – accessible water. Learn how the MARSIS instrument is helping answer this question. 

Read More about Meridiani Planum and the Search for Ice on Mars
favorite
MARSIS Radar Instrument
Tue, September 26 2017

The Challenge of Communication in Space

Communication is vitally important to astronauts while they are in space. Explore how experts communicate with the astronauts aboard the International Space Station in this week's STEM in 30.

Read More about The Challenge of Communication in Space
favorite
The International Space Station (ISS)
Fri, September 22 2017

Dreams Soar: Inspiring Women in Aviation

Aviator Shaesta Waiz and her Dreams Soars, Inc, "Dream Team" promoted STEM education to girls from DC Metro Public Schools at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Read More about Dreams Soar: Inspiring Women in Aviation
favorite
Pilot Shaesta Waiz, of Dreams Soar Inc., speaking to public school students at the National Air and Space Museum.
Fri, June 9 2017

The Saga of Writing in Space

From dashing off a quick note to creating painstaking calligraphy, we often take writing for granted. But in space, where the stakes are high, how does one write? After all, the ink in pens isn’t held down by gravity, so how do you write upside down? 

Read More about The Saga of Writing in Space
favorite
Knee Note Pad : Friendship 7
Mon, June 5 2017

A Brief History of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems

Last week a United States’ “hit-to-kill vehicle” intercepted and destroyed a mock intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) for the first time during a test. Until fifteen years ago, however, anti-ballistic missiles (ABMs) like the one just tested were banned under the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty signed by the United States and Soviet Union in 1972.   

Read More about A Brief History of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems
favorite
Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle Model
Wed, January 4 2017

Examining the SLS Rocket with Astronaut Christina Koch

NASA is building a brand new rocket for the future of human spaceflight. Astronaut Christina Koch, who graduated from NASA’s astronaut training program in 2015, helps us examine the Space Launch System rocket in more detail. 

Read More about Examining the SLS Rocket with Astronaut Christina Koch
favorite
SLS Rocket
Tue, November 1 2016

Spaceflight to Parade Float

Visitors to the newly renovated Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall may miss one particular satellite hanging amongst historical heavyweights such as the Ryan NYP Spirit of St. Louis and the Lunar Module LM-2. This object, however, with its distinctive blue solar panels deployed, is a full-scale engineering prototype of Mariner 2, the first spacecraft to radio useful scientific data from the vicinity of another planet, Venus.

Read More about Spaceflight to Parade Float
favorite
The Venus of Pasadena Rose Bowl float
Fri, October 28 2016

Your Captions: Just Hanging Around

File this next photo from our “Caption This” series under bizarre work-place duties. The captions you submitted were spot on. The truth is this man is no circus performer, he’s a test subject. In 1966-1967, NASA Langley developed OMEGA (One-Man Extravehicular Gimbal Arrangement). OMEGA was created to simulate weightlessness and permitted its tester unlimited movement. Tests were conducted using OMEGA with subjects in flight suits and pressure suits to determine the best operation techniques and refinements to the device.

Read More about Your Captions: Just Hanging Around
favorite
OMEGA Testing

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More