Topic

Science

Showing 1 - 10 of 24
Fri, September 16 2016

From "Computer" to Astronomer: The Role of Women in Astronomy

Long before your laptop computer and the computers that took us to the Moon, there was another type of computer. In the early 20th century, women who made calculations and reduced astronomical data were known as “computers.” The hours were long and the pay was minimal. Their calculations, however, laid important groundwork for future astronomers and led to some of the most important astronomical discoveries.

Read More about From "Computer" to Astronomer: The Role of Women in Astronomy
favorite
Phoebe Waterman Haas Ascending Solar Tower
Tue, August 16 2016

Food & Flight: Harrison Schmitt’s Chili

Harrison “Jack” Schmitt was the first and last geologist to visit the Moon. Below is his secret chili recipe, served best with a side of tortilla chips and some space history. We can’t help with the chips, but we can tell you a little about this chili-making astronaut.

Read More about Food & Flight: Harrison Schmitt’s Chili
favorite
Man on the Moon
Fri, August 5 2016

On This Day: Juno Began Journey to Jupiter

On this day in 2011, Juno began its journey to Jupiter. After an almost five-year journey, the spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit, and has since been investigating the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Read More about On This Day: Juno Began Journey to Jupiter
favorite
An artist's rendering showing Juno spacecraft
Wed, June 15 2016

Inventing the Apollo Spaceflight Biomedical Sensors

During the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions, one of NASA’s concerns was the safety of its crews, something it monitored rigorously through the use of biomedical instrumentation. As initial flight planning commenced in 1959, biomedical equipment capable of transmitting from space did not exist. NASA quickly brought together medical staff and hardware engineers to develop biomedical technology.

Read More about Inventing the Apollo Spaceflight Biomedical Sensors
favorite
Apollo Medical Instrumentation
Mon, March 7 2016

Observing the Surface of Venus with the Arecibo Telescope

This past summer I had the opportunity to operate the world’s largest single-dish telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

Read More about Observing the Surface of Venus with the Arecibo Telescope
favorite
Venus Impact Crater Ejecta
Fri, August 14 2015

Remembering Claudia Alexander—Space Scientist

Claudia Alexander was perhaps not well-known to the general public, but within the space and science community she was a valued colleague and friend whose contribution to the field of space exploration was significant and lasting.

Read More about Remembering Claudia Alexander—Space Scientist
favorite
 Claudia Alexander
Thu, July 2 2015

Casting Shadows on the Moon

Much of the Moon is blanketed by a thick layer of dust, built up from the rocky surface over billions of years by the impacts of small meteorites. Hidden beneath the dust is evidence of ancient geologic activity – great volcanic eruptions, tectonic shifts in the crust, and vast deposits of once-molten material hurled outward during the formation of the giant impact basins.

Read More about Casting Shadows on the Moon
favorite
Radar Image of the Moon
Thu, May 14 2015

Finding Pluto With the Blink Comparator

It all started at a special public lecture at the Museum in July 2014 given by Alan Stern, the lead scientist for the New Horizons mission, which will fly past Pluto this July. Among the attendees was William Lowell Putnam IV, sole trustee of the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona—the place where Pluto was found in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh. It was an exciting evening, not only to learn about the impending flyby but also having a chance to speak with Putnam and the director of the Lowell Observatory, Jeff Hall.

Read More about Finding Pluto With the Blink Comparator
favorite
Blink Comparator
Sat, March 14 2015

Reflections on Pi Day, March 14

Purdue University, located in West Lafayette, Indiana, has a special place in the annals of space exploration, having among its graduates 23 (and counting) astronauts, including Gus Grissom, Neil Armstrong, and a host of shuttle crew members, who have flown on more than 40 shuttle missions.

Read More about Reflections on Pi Day, March 14
favorite
Clarence A. Waldo
Fri, February 27 2015

Vance Marchbanks' Contribution to Public Health Policy on Sickle Cell Disease

Dr. Vance Marchbanks, Jr. is famous in both the black history and aerospace history communities for his accomplishments as one of the first in his field. He was one of two black MDs to complete the United States Army Air Corps School in Aerospace Medicine at the beginning of World War II. His fame continued through his association with the 99th and 301st Fighter Groups, who later became known as the Tuskegee Airmen.

Read More about Vance Marchbanks' Contribution to Public Health Policy on Sickle Cell Disease
favorite
Vance H. Marchbanks Jr.

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More